Nazarene Space

Scripture I know to be Holy Spirit inspired writings. If you would have asked me a few weeks ago what I considered scripture, I would have quickly said, The Tanak and the Brit Chadashah only! Now, only a few short weeks later however, I must say I'm not so sure! I have been having a marvelous time reading all these posts here on Nazarene Space and I have been given so much new revelation it's amazing. I have also realized that I am guilty of putting Yahweh into a christian shaped box! I've known about the book of Jasher and Enoch for some time, but I just found out very interesting info. on the Apocraphia in a post here and was quite surprized to find out that the Catholic bible has legitimate writings not included in any bible I've ever read! Could this be Scripture? I mean I just always believed what tradition has taught, that is that old King James hand picked the true inspired canon that we read today. But how do I really know that? Says who. To come to think of it, it's not written anywhere, it's just accepted like that! So now I find myself on a journey that will consist of prayer and visious hours of research and study to find out, how small this box is that I have apparently been keeping the Almighty in! I mean truth beyond King James was unheard of for me just 2 short years ago, but here I go, on my way to hopefully shedding off another layer of christian junk that was so quickly fastened on to me not long after my Messiah revealed to me my need for Him! If anyone can throw some nuggets my way I'll be thankful, but either way, I will be sure to keep everyone up to date on what I am learning and what the Lord reveals to me, also probably bring some questions to the table! So maybe this is all for naught, maybe this takes me nowhere, but somethings telling me that there is much to find and that there is more to Yahweh than what I've known!

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I would like to encourage you to explore the Apochrypha, albeit cautiously. If you get into "christian apocrypha", which was written mostly in the 2nd century c.e., or later, you will find all sorts of wierd stuff and hatred toward Jews. But the Jewish Apocrypha is very interesting. I have difficulty at this time in placing it on the level of the TaNaK or Apostolic Writings, in which case I differ with James Trimm, but i also admit I may be wrong. Jude does quote from the book of Enoch as Scripture. James has done some masterful work in documenting qoutes from some of the Apocrypha in the Apostolic writings, which I would recommend. Even tho at this time I may slightly differ, I do have alot of respect for James' opinions and scholarship and believe his guidance would be very beneficial in this endeavor. Blessings, Shalom, kenny cartwright
Interesting comment, very similar to my thoughts. Thankyou for putting it in words. Shabbat Shalom, kenny cartwright
Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) In Arcana Caelestia 10325. The books of the Word are all those which have the internal sense; books which do not have it are not the Word. The books of the Word in the Old Testament are: The five Books of Moses; the Book of Joshua; the Book of Judges; the two Books of Samuel; the two Books of Kings; the Psalms of David; and the Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. And in the New Testament they are: The four Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, John; and the Book of Revelation.

There is another teaching that Job, Jasher, Enoch are the Ancient Word and has an internal sense but differs in form. The holy books of various religions are important for doctrinal teachings and are of use but they are not the Word.

The Tanak and the NT.

 

TaNaK:

  • Torah
  • Nevi'im
  • Ketuvim

 

NT:

  • Gospels and Acts
  • Apostolic Epistles, General Epistles
  • Pauline Epistles
  • The Revelation of Yeshua the Messiah

 

There are certain works outside the Tanakh and Apostolic Writings that I have no issue accepting as fully authentic, such as the (standard) Apocrypha (and Jasher). Then there are certain works that I accept with some reservations, such as Enoch, Aseneth, the Gospel of Thomas, Clement of Rome, etc. Then there are works that I outright reject, such as Jubilees, Hermas, etc.

Christian said:

The Tanak and the NT.

 

TaNaK:

  • Torah
  • Nevi'im
  • Ketuvim

 

NT:

  • Gospels and Acts
  • Apostolic Epistles, General Epistles
  • Pauline Epistles
  • The Revelation of Yeshua the Messiah

 

Things can be authentic, without being canonical.
I try to emphasize the huge distinction between the canonized sayings of Solomon, and those sayings of Solomon which were not canonized;
the difference between the canonical prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and so forth, and the un-canonical, yet fully inspired prophets that are mentioned, Shemaiah, Iddo, Nathan, Gad, and so forth.

A text may be fully authentic, doctrinally accurate, theologically flawless, and yet not canonical, that is to say, a part of the one and unique collection of Scriptures which we call the Bible.
I suspect many of the texts you mentioned may be flawless and perfect, yet not meant to be part of the canon, which I must conclude to be a closed work.


J. Jury said:
There are certain works outside the Tanakh and Apostolic Writings that I have no issue accepting as fully authentic, such as the (standard) Apocrypha (and Jasher). Then there are certain works that I accept with some reservations, such as Enoch, Aseneth, the Gospel of Thomas, Clement of Rome, etc. Then there are works that I outright reject, such as Jubilees, Hermas, etc.

Christian said:

The Tanak and the NT.

 

TaNaK:

  • Torah
  • Nevi'im
  • Ketuvim

 

NT:

  • Gospels and Acts
  • Apostolic Epistles, General Epistles
  • Pauline Epistles
  • The Revelation of Yeshua the Messiah

 

I (in theory) tend to (partially) agree. My only concern is my supreme distrust for the "organization" that closed the canon in the first place.

Christian said:
Things can be authentic, without being canonical.
I try to emphasize the huge distinction between the canonized sayings of Solomon, and those sayings of Solomon which were not canonized;
the difference between the canonical prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and so forth, and the un-canonical, yet fully inspired prophets that are mentioned, Shemaiah, Iddo, Nathan, Gad, and so forth.

A text may be fully authentic, doctrinally accurate, theologically flawless, and yet not canonical, that is to say, a part of the one and unique collection of Scriptures which we call the Bible.
I suspect many of the texts you mentioned may be flawless and perfect, yet not meant to be part of the canon, which I must conclude to be a closed work.


J. Jury said:
There are certain works outside the Tanakh and Apostolic Writings that I have no issue accepting as fully authentic, such as the (standard) Apocrypha (and Jasher). Then there are certain works that I accept with some reservations, such as Enoch, Aseneth, the Gospel of Thomas, Clement of Rome, etc. Then there are works that I outright reject, such as Jubilees, Hermas, etc.

Christian said:

The Tanak and the NT.

 

TaNaK:

  • Torah
  • Nevi'im
  • Ketuvim

 

NT:

  • Gospels and Acts
  • Apostolic Epistles, General Epistles
  • Pauline Epistles
  • The Revelation of Yeshua the Messiah

 

I am one of the few that advocates all of the books of Scripture as being Scripture.  this would be way more than the silly 66 canon.
My "canon" definitely includes those books that were used by the Nazarene forefathers.

Anayahu Priel (Andrew P) Carlson said:
I am one of the few that advocates all of the books of Scripture as being Scripture.  this would be way more than the silly 66 canon.

who do you deem as the Nazarene forefathers?

 

Did i ever tell you Jesse about the time when I found the Epistle of Barnabas quoting a portion of a book found in the Dead Sea Scrolls that is found nowhere else?

I don't believe so. What was it?


Anayahu Priel (Andrew P) Carlson said:

who do you deem as the Nazarene forefathers?

 

Did i ever tell you Jesse about the time when I found the Epistle of Barnabas quoting a portion of a book found in the Dead Sea Scrolls that is found nowhere else?

I'm going to post it in the canon group i made a while back

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