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(Deuteronomy 6:4 Translit) 4 šəma‘ yiśərā’ēl yəhwâ ’ĕlōhênû yəhwâ| ’eḥāḏ:5

“the creed of the Jews.”

(Deuteronomy 6:4 Translit)

$'ma,   yiS'ra`al   y'hvah   `elohaynu   y'hvah   `eHad  

4 šəma‘5 yiśərā’ēl yəhwâ ’ĕlōhê_nû yəhwâ| ’eḥāḏ:5

Israeli Authorized Version

(IAV) Hear, O Yisrael: YY our Elohim, YY is ONE.

Shalom,

my name is ali, a luke warm muslim or a non-practicing muslim, if you will. i am searching
and have a few questions.

please tell me whether the word _ ’ĕlōhê_ is singular or plural as in eloah or elohim and why. i have seen different translations and that is confusing.

please send me your comments.

thanks

ali

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Hi Ali, blessings to you.

Elohim is generally considered a plural of Eloah (Eloah corresponds to the Aramaic Elohe.)
However, despite being a plural name, the entity bearing this name is singular.

Compare the name "Ephraim" - its a plural word, but its the name of a singular person (and later the tribe bearing his name.)
Ephraim, the person, just like Elohim, the one God, is always referred to as "you" (singular), and "he/him" (singular) and not "ye" (plural), "they" or "them".
So its a singular entity whose name happens to be plural.

As for the actual meaning of Eloah, of which Elohim is the plural or majestic form, that's another question.
It may mean "god", or it may mean something like "force" or "power".
It could make sense for one Creator to have multiple powers, controlling the many forces of the world, thus explaining the name.

From My book The Middle Pillar

http://nazarenespace.com/page/books-dvds

 

According to the Encyclopedia Judaica the concept of the Sefirot creates a sort of plurality of intelligences within the Godhead:

 

…the unity of Elohim in his Sefirot and the appearance of plurality within the One are expressed through a great number of images which continually recur… a Godhead which was divided into… intelligences, each of unlimited richness and profundity,…

(Article on Kabbalah pages 569-570)

 

One of the most controversial facts about the Bible is that the word that is used most often for “Elohim” in the Hebrew usually appears in its plural form: Elohim. It has been argued that the word Elohim is a "majestic plural" however it has never been shown that such a thing as a majestic plural even exists in Hebrew. Moreover, while the term Elohim usually appears with singular verbs and adjectives, on several occasions it appears with plural verbs and adjectives:

 

And it came about, when ELOHIM caused (pl) me to wonder from the house of my father…

(Gen. 20:13- )

 

and he built there an alter, and called the place, EL Beth-El; because there [the] ELOHIM were revealed (pl) to him,…

(Gen. 35:7- )

 

For what great nation is there that has Elohim so near (pl) to it, as YHWH our Elohim is to us…

(Dt. 4:7)

 

But Joshua said to the people,

"You cannot serve YHWH for He is a holy (pl) Elohim….

(Josh. 24:19)

 

…the one nation on the earth whom Elohim went (pl) to redeem for Himself as a people…

(2Sam. 7:23)

 

…Surely He is Elohim who judges (pl) in the earth.

(Ps. 58:12 (11 in non-Jewish versions))

 

Furthermore Elohim is referred to with plural pronouns as follows:

 

Then ELOHIM said,

"Let Us make man in Our image, according to our likeness…"

(Gen. 1:26- )

 

And YHVH ELOHIM said,

"Behold, the man has become like one from Us, knowing good and evil. …

(Gen. 3:22- )

 

Come, let Us [YHVH] go down and confuse their language…

(Gen. 11:7- )

 

Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying:

"Whom shall I send, and who will go for Us?"…

(Is. 6:8)

 

And there are other instances where Elohim is attributed some kind of plural nature:

 

Remember now your Creators in the days of your youth…

(Eccl. 12:1 - "Creators" is plural in the Hebrew but often-translated singular)

 

I watched till thrones were put in place, and the Ancient of Days was seated…

(Dan. 7:9)



Solomon Avar said:

Hi Ali, blessings to you.

Elohim is generally considered a plural of Eloah (Eloah corresponds to the Aramaic Elohe.)
However, despite being a plural name, the entity bearing this name is singular.

Compare the name "Ephraim" - its a plural word, but its the name of a singular person (and later the tribe bearing his name.)
Ephraim, the person, just like Elohim, the one God, is always referred to as "you" (singular), and "he/him" (singular) and not "ye" (plural), "they" or "them".
So its a singular entity whose name happens to be plural.

As for the actual meaning of Eloah, of which Elohim is the plural or majestic form, that's another question.
It may mean "god", or it may mean something like "force" or "power".
It could make sense for one Creator to have multiple powers, controlling the many forces of the world, thus explaining the name.

You should read the books:

The Middle Pillar and The Great Mystery

http://nazarenespace.com/page/books-dvds

 

 

 

thanks for your time and effort.

 

 

i am still searching and i have much to learn,

 

as well, open up my mind to new views and concepts,


foreign to what i have believed / subscribed to before.

 

thank you kindly,

ali

 



Solomon Avar said:

 

 

Hi Ali, blessings to you.

Elohim is generally considered a plural of Eloah (Eloah corresponds to the Aramaic Elohe.)
However, despite being a plural name, the entity bearing this name is singular.

Compare the name "Ephraim" - its a plural word, but its the name of a singular person (and later the tribe bearing his name.)
Ephraim, the person, just like Elohim, the one God, is always referred to as "you" (singular), and "he/him" (singular) and not "ye" (plural), "they" or "them".
So its a singular entity whose name happens to be plural.

As for the actual meaning of Eloah, of which Elohim is the plural or majestic form, that's another question.
It may mean "god", or it may mean something like "force" or "power".
It could make sense for one Creator to have multiple powers, controlling the many forces of the world, thus explaining the name.

 

 

 

thanks for your time and effort.

 

 

i am still searching and i have much to learn,

 

as well, open up my mind to new views and concepts,


foreign to what i have believed / subscribed to before.

 

thank you kindly,

ali

 



Solomon Avar said:

 

 

Hi Ali, blessings to you.

Elohim is generally considered a plural of Eloah (Eloah corresponds to the Aramaic Elohe.)
However, despite being a plural name, the entity bearing this name is singular.

Compare the name "Ephraim" - its a plural word, but its the name of a singular person (and later the tribe bearing his name.)
Ephraim, the person, just like Elohim, the one God, is always referred to as "you" (singular), and "he/him" (singular) and not "ye" (plural), "they" or "them".
So its a singular entity whose name happens to be plural.

As for the actual meaning of Eloah, of which Elohim is the plural or majestic form, that's another question.
It may mean "god", or it may mean something like "force" or "power".
It could make sense for one Creator to have multiple powers, controlling the many forces of the world, thus explaining the name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

thanks for your time and effort.

 

 

i am still searching and i have much to learn,

 

as well, open up my mind to new views and concepts,


foreign to what i have believed / subscribed to before.

 

thank you kindly,

ali

 



Solomon Avar said:

 

 

Hi Ali, blessings to you.

Elohim is generally considered a plural of Eloah (Eloah corresponds to the Aramaic Elohe.)
However, despite being a plural name, the entity bearing this name is singular.

Compare the name "Ephraim" - its a plural word, but its the name of a singular person (and later the tribe bearing his name.)
Ephraim, the person, just like Elohim, the one God, is always referred to as "you" (singular), and "he/him" (singular) and not "ye" (plural), "they" or "them".
So its a singular entity whose name happens to be plural.

As for the actual meaning of Eloah, of which Elohim is the plural or majestic form, that's another question.
It may mean "god", or it may mean something like "force" or "power".
It could make sense for one Creator to have multiple powers, controlling the many forces of the world, thus explaining the name.

 

 

 

 

please tell me whether the word _ ’ĕlōhê_ is singular or plural as in eloah or elohim and why. i have seen different translations and that is confusing.

 

the SUM of all powers taken separately by gentiles to be many is one. it is mathematically singular!

 

the term should be taken as singular "compound" thus it ends with final "...him".

all the powers that be which gentiles take to be separately accounted to many gods (god of harvest, god of war, etc.) are known to Israel to be Only One G-d, the G-d of Avrahom, Itzchak and Yaakov.

 

do not muddle your antagonistic thoughts into the term. learn if you must.

 

 



please and i beg you beryl,

do not rrespond to my posts with such language.

 

your faith is your faith and i have no right to question it.

 

hope you too, can extend the same courtesy to me

or better yet keep away from posts.

 

 

beryl etanah said:

 

do not muddle your antagonistic thoughts into the term. learn if you must.

 

 

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