Nazarene Space

What are the advantages / disadvantages of each?

I used to be a firm believer in the Enoch (364) day solar calendar, but now I'm not so sure. It really seems like months should be based off of lunar cycles (29.5 days) based on Genesis 1... I'm not saying that I definitively reject the Enoch 364 day calendar, just that I am really starting to question it, and I am open to everyone's thoughts/opinions on the subject.

1) What calendar do you keep?
2) What facts do you base this decision on?

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But if it says "this new moon is the head new moon for you, it is the first new moon of the year", doesn't that pretty clearly state (by implication if nothing else) that the lunar cycle- not the equinox- begins the year?

Researching the Greek, it seems to say, "This new moon will be the point of origin for the first of the year".

sevynn leverette said:
The original text reads accordingly Exodus 12:1, 2
wal'yo'mer YEWE el mo'sheh we'el a'ha'ron be'e'rets mits' ra'yim leymor and YEWE said to Moshe and Aharon in land Mitzrayim

2 ha hho'desh hazeh la'khem rosh hha'da'shim ri'shon hu la khem lehhad'shey ha'sha' rah

the new moon you head new moon is the first new moon the year

This text is stating the first new moon is head new moon

sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural.

This seems to follow the original text rather than inserting words to form a theology.

Any astronomer will confirm the position of the stars with sun to determine its circuit. Naval Observatory which has no theology to prove agrees with the stars being present.

Shalom
nothing implies new year, but of the year. As brother Phillip pointed out sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural. sha-neyh refers to the yearly revolution, which refers to the sun?????

The Hebrew word TKUFAH, Strong's number 8622, occurs four times in the Bible, Ex 34:22; I Sam 1:20; II Chr 24:23; Ps 19:7. In 1907 when the well-known lexicon by Brown, Driver, and Briggs was published (see page 880 for TKUFAH), the Dead Sea Scrolls were not yet discovered and clarifying insightful meanings into some ancient Hebrew words were not yet available. The Dead Sea Scrolls use the Hebrew word TKUFAH in contexts before the time of Christ, and this is now discussed.
In The Jewish Quarterly Review, volume 58, 1967-1968, pages 309-316 there is a paper published by Sidney B. Hoenig titled, "Textual Readings and Meanings in Hodayot (I QH)." This is from the Dead Sea Scrolls. On pages 312-313 he discusses two expressions found there: one is "TKUFAH of the day" and the other is "at the appointed time of the night at TKUFAH". Hoenig explains that the former means "zenith of the day" meaning "noon" and the latter means "at the appointed time of the night at zenith" meaning "midnight". It is particularly interesting that in the expression "at the appointed time of the night at TKUFAH" the Hebrew word for "appointed time" is MOED, the same word used for the holy days in Lev 23 and for seasons in Gen 1:14. Thus it is not foreign to ancient Hebrew to use or associate TKUFAH with MOED. This use of TKUFAH shows two heavenly bodies, the earth and sun, interacting on a daily basis so that at astronomically distinctive points in time TKUFAH refers to those points in time.
In The Madrid Qumran Congress, volume 2, edited by Julio Trebolle Barrera and Luis Vegas Montaner (Leiden: Brill, 1992), there is a chapter by Johann Maier titled "Shire Olat hash-Shabbat. Some Observations on their Calendric Implications and on their Style". On page 146 Maier writes, "The Songs themselves are attached to the thirteen sabbaths of one quarter or season (tqufah) of a year, according to the editor the first quarter (the Nisan season) only." Here we see the Hebrew word TKUFAH used for the season of spring, which begins with the vernal equinox and ends with the summer solstice. Here also astronomically distinctive points in time involving the earth and sun define a time period called TKUFAH.
The intertestamental apocryphal Book of Sirach (also known as Ecclesiasticus) contains the Hebrew word TKUFAH. This book was written in Hebrew about 190 BCE, but today only incomplete sections of it have survived, having been discovered with thousands of other Hebrew texts in the attic of a synagogue in Cairo, Egypt toward the end of the nineteenth century. The treasure of texts in that attic which survived for many hundreds of years is known as the Cairo Geniza. There are many copies of Sirach in Greek translation, and most of the Hebrew words in Sirach 43:7 are preserved, one of them being TKUFAH. The Greek translation for TKUFAH is SUNTELIA (Strong's Greek number 4930) which means completion, fulfillment, or destruction. These words indicate a point in time at which some event occurred. In harmony with this idea, the Jerusalem Bible translates Sirach 43:7, "the moon it is that signals the feasts, a luminary that wanes after her full". Here "her full" refers to the full moon and is translated from TKUFAH or SUNTELIA. Here TKUFAH refers to a natural distinctive time of the moon in its movement about the earth.
These contexts from the Dead Sea Scrolls and from Sirach from before the time of Christ show the Hebrew word TKUFAH used to refer to natural distinctive points or time intervals associated with the heavenly bodies of the earth, sun, and moon.
In A Concise Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament by William L. Holladay (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1971), on page 394 the word TKUFAH is defined. The parentheses and square brackets are part of the text of that book by Holladay where he writes about TKUFAH "turning (of sun at solstice) Ps 19:7; (of the year, i.e. end of year, at autumnal equinox) Ex 34:22; (of the days [i.e. of the year] = end of year I Sam 1:20".
In Ex 34:22 Moses was told, in literal translation, "And you shall celebrate ... the Feast of Ingathering TKUFAH the year". There is no Hebrew preposition attached to TKUFAH here. In harmony with the astronomical uses shown above, this refers to the autumnal equinox. Certainly Moses was aware of the equinoxes from the knowledge he gained in his upbringing in Egypt (Acts 7:22), and the fact that the greatest pyramids had one wall aligned exactly east-west. Only on the days of the equinoxes does the shadow of a vertical object fall exactly east-west all day long. The ancients were easily able to determine an east-west line. Therefore the equinoxes are visible signs of the sun in relation to the earth and do fall within the purview of signs in Gen 1:14 "lights in the expanse of the heavens ... for signs and for festivals and for days and years". Note also that these, the lights in the sky, are for years. It would take some specific other Scripture, not some vague implication, to overturn the signs of the lights in the heavens for determining the festivals.
I refrained from using references in the Talmud for TKUFAH to mean an equinox or solstice, although they have this meaning in the Talmud many times, because I do not accept the Talmud as a proper way to establish meanings of biblical Hebrew words. ~HS

Shalom


J. Jury said:
But if it says "this new moon is the head new moon for you, it is the first new moon of the year", doesn't that pretty clearly state (by implication if nothing else) that the lunar cycle- not the equinox- begins the year?

Researching the Greek, it seems to say, "This new moon will be the point of origin for the first of the year".

sevynn leverette said:
The original text reads accordingly Exodus 12:1, 2
wal'yo'mer YEWE el mo'sheh we'el a'ha'ron be'e'rets mits' ra'yim leymor and YEWE said to Moshe and Aharon in land Mitzrayim

2 ha hho'desh hazeh la'khem rosh hha'da'shim ri'shon hu la khem lehhad'shey ha'sha' rah

the new moon you head new moon is the first new moon the year

This text is stating the first new moon is head new moon

sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural.

This seems to follow the original text rather than inserting words to form a theology.

Any astronomer will confirm the position of the stars with sun to determine its circuit. Naval Observatory which has no theology to prove agrees with the stars being present.

Shalom
I was only referencing the Greek, which states pretty clearly "first of the year".

Of course, I recognize that the Hebrew is superior, but I still don't agree that this is what the Hebrew is saying.

sevynn leverette said:
nothing implies new year, but of the year. As brother Phillip pointed out sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural. sha-neyh refers to the yearly revolution, which refers to the sun?????

The Hebrew word TKUFAH, Strong's number 8622, occurs four times in the Bible, Ex 34:22; I Sam 1:20; II Chr 24:23; Ps 19:7. In 1907 when the well-known lexicon by Brown, Driver, and Briggs was published (see page 880 for TKUFAH), the Dead Sea Scrolls were not yet discovered and clarifying insightful meanings into some ancient Hebrew words were not yet available. The Dead Sea Scrolls use the Hebrew word TKUFAH in contexts before the time of Christ, and this is now discussed.
In The Jewish Quarterly Review, volume 58, 1967-1968, pages 309-316 there is a paper published by Sidney B. Hoenig titled, "Textual Readings and Meanings in Hodayot (I QH)." This is from the Dead Sea Scrolls. On pages 312-313 he discusses two expressions found there: one is "TKUFAH of the day" and the other is "at the appointed time of the night at TKUFAH". Hoenig explains that the former means "zenith of the day" meaning "noon" and the latter means "at the appointed time of the night at zenith" meaning "midnight". It is particularly interesting that in the expression "at the appointed time of the night at TKUFAH" the Hebrew word for "appointed time" is MOED, the same word used for the holy days in Lev 23 and for seasons in Gen 1:14. Thus it is not foreign to ancient Hebrew to use or associate TKUFAH with MOED. This use of TKUFAH shows two heavenly bodies, the earth and sun, interacting on a daily basis so that at astronomically distinctive points in time TKUFAH refers to those points in time.
In The Madrid Qumran Congress, volume 2, edited by Julio Trebolle Barrera and Luis Vegas Montaner (Leiden: Brill, 1992), there is a chapter by Johann Maier titled "Shire Olat hash-Shabbat. Some Observations on their Calendric Implications and on their Style". On page 146 Maier writes, "The Songs themselves are attached to the thirteen sabbaths of one quarter or season (tqufah) of a year, according to the editor the first quarter (the Nisan season) only." Here we see the Hebrew word TKUFAH used for the season of spring, which begins with the vernal equinox and ends with the summer solstice. Here also astronomically distinctive points in time involving the earth and sun define a time period called TKUFAH.
The intertestamental apocryphal Book of Sirach (also known as Ecclesiasticus) contains the Hebrew word TKUFAH. This book was written in Hebrew about 190 BCE, but today only incomplete sections of it have survived, having been discovered with thousands of other Hebrew texts in the attic of a synagogue in Cairo, Egypt toward the end of the nineteenth century. The treasure of texts in that attic which survived for many hundreds of years is known as the Cairo Geniza. There are many copies of Sirach in Greek translation, and most of the Hebrew words in Sirach 43:7 are preserved, one of them being TKUFAH. The Greek translation for TKUFAH is SUNTELIA (Strong's Greek number 4930) which means completion, fulfillment, or destruction. These words indicate a point in time at which some event occurred. In harmony with this idea, the Jerusalem Bible translates Sirach 43:7, "the moon it is that signals the feasts, a luminary that wanes after her full". Here "her full" refers to the full moon and is translated from TKUFAH or SUNTELIA. Here TKUFAH refers to a natural distinctive time of the moon in its movement about the earth.
These contexts from the Dead Sea Scrolls and from Sirach from before the time of Christ show the Hebrew word TKUFAH used to refer to natural distinctive points or time intervals associated with the heavenly bodies of the earth, sun, and moon.
In A Concise Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament by William L. Holladay (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1971), on page 394 the word TKUFAH is defined. The parentheses and square brackets are part of the text of that book by Holladay where he writes about TKUFAH "turning (of sun at solstice) Ps 19:7; (of the year, i.e. end of year, at autumnal equinox) Ex 34:22; (of the days [i.e. of the year] = end of year I Sam 1:20".
In Ex 34:22 Moses was told, in literal translation, "And you shall celebrate ... the Feast of Ingathering TKUFAH the year". There is no Hebrew preposition attached to TKUFAH here. In harmony with the astronomical uses shown above, this refers to the autumnal equinox. Certainly Moses was aware of the equinoxes from the knowledge he gained in his upbringing in Egypt (Acts 7:22), and the fact that the greatest pyramids had one wall aligned exactly east-west. Only on the days of the equinoxes does the shadow of a vertical object fall exactly east-west all day long. The ancients were easily able to determine an east-west line. Therefore the equinoxes are visible signs of the sun in relation to the earth and do fall within the purview of signs in Gen 1:14 "lights in the expanse of the heavens ... for signs and for festivals and for days and years". Note also that these, the lights in the sky, are for years. It would take some specific other Scripture, not some vague implication, to overturn the signs of the lights in the heavens for determining the festivals.
I refrained from using references in the Talmud for TKUFAH to mean an equinox or solstice, although they have this meaning in the Talmud many times, because I do not accept the Talmud as a proper way to establish meanings of biblical Hebrew words. ~HS

Shalom


J. Jury said:
But if it says "this new moon is the head new moon for you, it is the first new moon of the year", doesn't that pretty clearly state (by implication if nothing else) that the lunar cycle- not the equinox- begins the year?

Researching the Greek, it seems to say, "This new moon will be the point of origin for the first of the year".

sevynn leverette said:
The original text reads accordingly Exodus 12:1, 2
wal'yo'mer YEWE el mo'sheh we'el a'ha'ron be'e'rets mits' ra'yim leymor and YEWE said to Moshe and Aharon in land Mitzrayim

2 ha hho'desh hazeh la'khem rosh hha'da'shim ri'shon hu la khem lehhad'shey ha'sha' rah

the new moon you head new moon is the first new moon the year

This text is stating the first new moon is head new moon

sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural.

This seems to follow the original text rather than inserting words to form a theology.

Any astronomer will confirm the position of the stars with sun to determine its circuit. Naval Observatory which has no theology to prove agrees with the stars being present.

Shalom
shalom, I do not believe that the Enochian calendar is the one for the saints of Yah today, the basis of the calendar I observe is both the solar and lunar cycles. The new year begins with the new moon occuring on or after the equinox. true, a different method of reckoning was used during Enoch's time but there have been changes in the earth's motion due to Noah's flood.
YEWE is the Infinite Invisible Authority which has placed all things in order, the sun is the greater light the moon the lesser light, as YEWE is the greater light and the son the lesser, when the sun amd moon appear in the same thought passage the greater will always take its place in order of things as with Exodus 12:2 the new moons are correct, as is the sun/the revolution of time/sha-neyh confirming Genesis 1:14 they divide the year for us months, days, and years.

Shalom


J. Jury said:
I was only referencing the Greek, which states pretty clearly "first of the year".

Of course, I recognize that the Hebrew is superior, but I still don't agree that this is what the Hebrew is saying.

sevynn leverette said:
nothing implies new year, but of the year. As brother Phillip pointed out sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural. sha-neyh refers to the yearly revolution, which refers to the sun?????

The Hebrew word TKUFAH, Strong's number 8622, occurs four times in the Bible, Ex 34:22; I Sam 1:20; II Chr 24:23; Ps 19:7. In 1907 when the well-known lexicon by Brown, Driver, and Briggs was published (see page 880 for TKUFAH), the Dead Sea Scrolls were not yet discovered and clarifying insightful meanings into some ancient Hebrew words were not yet available. The Dead Sea Scrolls use the Hebrew word TKUFAH in contexts before the time of Christ, and this is now discussed.
In The Jewish Quarterly Review, volume 58, 1967-1968, pages 309-316 there is a paper published by Sidney B. Hoenig titled, "Textual Readings and Meanings in Hodayot (I QH)." This is from the Dead Sea Scrolls. On pages 312-313 he discusses two expressions found there: one is "TKUFAH of the day" and the other is "at the appointed time of the night at TKUFAH". Hoenig explains that the former means "zenith of the day" meaning "noon" and the latter means "at the appointed time of the night at zenith" meaning "midnight". It is particularly interesting that in the expression "at the appointed time of the night at TKUFAH" the Hebrew word for "appointed time" is MOED, the same word used for the holy days in Lev 23 and for seasons in Gen 1:14. Thus it is not foreign to ancient Hebrew to use or associate TKUFAH with MOED. This use of TKUFAH shows two heavenly bodies, the earth and sun, interacting on a daily basis so that at astronomically distinctive points in time TKUFAH refers to those points in time.
In The Madrid Qumran Congress, volume 2, edited by Julio Trebolle Barrera and Luis Vegas Montaner (Leiden: Brill, 1992), there is a chapter by Johann Maier titled "Shire Olat hash-Shabbat. Some Observations on their Calendric Implications and on their Style". On page 146 Maier writes, "The Songs themselves are attached to the thirteen sabbaths of one quarter or season (tqufah) of a year, according to the editor the first quarter (the Nisan season) only." Here we see the Hebrew word TKUFAH used for the season of spring, which begins with the vernal equinox and ends with the summer solstice. Here also astronomically distinctive points in time involving the earth and sun define a time period called TKUFAH.
The intertestamental apocryphal Book of Sirach (also known as Ecclesiasticus) contains the Hebrew word TKUFAH. This book was written in Hebrew about 190 BCE, but today only incomplete sections of it have survived, having been discovered with thousands of other Hebrew texts in the attic of a synagogue in Cairo, Egypt toward the end of the nineteenth century. The treasure of texts in that attic which survived for many hundreds of years is known as the Cairo Geniza. There are many copies of Sirach in Greek translation, and most of the Hebrew words in Sirach 43:7 are preserved, one of them being TKUFAH. The Greek translation for TKUFAH is SUNTELIA (Strong's Greek number 4930) which means completion, fulfillment, or destruction. These words indicate a point in time at which some event occurred. In harmony with this idea, the Jerusalem Bible translates Sirach 43:7, "the moon it is that signals the feasts, a luminary that wanes after her full". Here "her full" refers to the full moon and is translated from TKUFAH or SUNTELIA. Here TKUFAH refers to a natural distinctive time of the moon in its movement about the earth.
These contexts from the Dead Sea Scrolls and from Sirach from before the time of Christ show the Hebrew word TKUFAH used to refer to natural distinctive points or time intervals associated with the heavenly bodies of the earth, sun, and moon.
In A Concise Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament by William L. Holladay (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1971), on page 394 the word TKUFAH is defined. The parentheses and square brackets are part of the text of that book by Holladay where he writes about TKUFAH "turning (of sun at solstice) Ps 19:7; (of the year, i.e. end of year, at autumnal equinox) Ex 34:22; (of the days [i.e. of the year] = end of year I Sam 1:20".
In Ex 34:22 Moses was told, in literal translation, "And you shall celebrate ... the Feast of Ingathering TKUFAH the year". There is no Hebrew preposition attached to TKUFAH here. In harmony with the astronomical uses shown above, this refers to the autumnal equinox. Certainly Moses was aware of the equinoxes from the knowledge he gained in his upbringing in Egypt (Acts 7:22), and the fact that the greatest pyramids had one wall aligned exactly east-west. Only on the days of the equinoxes does the shadow of a vertical object fall exactly east-west all day long. The ancients were easily able to determine an east-west line. Therefore the equinoxes are visible signs of the sun in relation to the earth and do fall within the purview of signs in Gen 1:14 "lights in the expanse of the heavens ... for signs and for festivals and for days and years". Note also that these, the lights in the sky, are for years. It would take some specific other Scripture, not some vague implication, to overturn the signs of the lights in the heavens for determining the festivals.
I refrained from using references in the Talmud for TKUFAH to mean an equinox or solstice, although they have this meaning in the Talmud many times, because I do not accept the Talmud as a proper way to establish meanings of biblical Hebrew words. ~HS

Shalom


J. Jury said:
But if it says "this new moon is the head new moon for you, it is the first new moon of the year", doesn't that pretty clearly state (by implication if nothing else) that the lunar cycle- not the equinox- begins the year?

Researching the Greek, it seems to say, "This new moon will be the point of origin for the first of the year".

sevynn leverette said:
The original text reads accordingly Exodus 12:1, 2
wal'yo'mer YEWE el mo'sheh we'el a'ha'ron be'e'rets mits' ra'yim leymor and YEWE said to Moshe and Aharon in land Mitzrayim

2 ha hho'desh hazeh la'khem rosh hha'da'shim ri'shon hu la khem lehhad'shey ha'sha' rah

the new moon you head new moon is the first new moon the year

This text is stating the first new moon is head new moon

sha-neyh [fem] 8140; 8141 strongs AHLB 1474-A [n] a period of time of the solar circuit; Certain words in Hebrew are always plural.

This seems to follow the original text rather than inserting words to form a theology.

Any astronomer will confirm the position of the stars with sun to determine its circuit. Naval Observatory which has no theology to prove agrees with the stars being present.

Shalom
I would suggest that the moon- not the sun- divides the months. Otherwise, the moon seems to serve no real purpose, yet if used for lunar month cycles, then anyone can easily look out their window and see at what point one is during the month.

If the heavens are God's calendar, then (unlike the Enoch calendar), it was never really lost to the majority of the world. The moon has always been present.

sevynn leverette said:
YEWE is the Infinite Invisible Authority which has placed all things in order, the sun is the greater light the moon the lesser light, as YEWE is the greater light and the son the lesser, when the sun amd moon appear in the same thought passage the greater will always take its place in order of things as with Exodus 12:2 the new moons are correct, as is the sun/the revolution of time/sha-neyh confirming Genesis 1:14 they divide the year for us months, days, and years.

Shalom
Pure conjecture. All opinion, no proof.

The supposed Enoch calendar was essentially "lost" (for lack of better term) for thousands of years.

The pure, simple, basic lunar calendar has always been there. You just have to look outside to see it.

Anaiah Priel (Andrew P) Carlson said:
Scripturally, the Enoch Calendar is the only true Calendar. All other calendars fail to pass the test of authentic calendar outlined in the Scriptures.
where does Scripture suugest this or is this opinion???????

it seems these post go from evidence to opinion, what actual Scripture makes thi suggestion, to keep saying Enoch is not correct is silly, show where the moon suggest this????

Shalom

J. Jury said:
I would suggest that the moon- not the sun- divides the months. Otherwise, the moon seems to serve no real purpose, yet if used for lunar month cycles, then anyone can easily look out their window and see at what point one is during the month.

If the heavens are God's calendar, then (unlike the Enoch calendar), it was never really lost to the majority of the world. The moon has always been present.

sevynn leverette said:
YEWE is the Infinite Invisible Authority which has placed all things in order, the sun is the greater light the moon the lesser light, as YEWE is the greater light and the son the lesser, when the sun amd moon appear in the same thought passage the greater will always take its place in order of things as with Exodus 12:2 the new moons are correct, as is the sun/the revolution of time/sha-neyh confirming Genesis 1:14 they divide the year for us months, days, and years.

Shalom
It's opinion based on the fact that Scripture doesn't endorse the Enoch calendar. The Enoch calendar rejects lunar reckoning altogether, when Scripture blatantly teaches lunar reckoning.

Hence, it is opinion.

sevynn leverette said:
where does Scripture suugest this or is this opinion???????

Shalom

J. Jury said:
I would suggest that the moon- not the sun- divides the months. Otherwise, the moon seems to serve no real purpose, yet if used for lunar month cycles, then anyone can easily look out their window and see at what point one is during the month.

If the heavens are God's calendar, then (unlike the Enoch calendar), it was never really lost to the majority of the world. The moon has always been present.

sevynn leverette said:
YEWE is the Infinite Invisible Authority which has placed all things in order, the sun is the greater light the moon the lesser light, as YEWE is the greater light and the son the lesser, when the sun amd moon appear in the same thought passage the greater will always take its place in order of things as with Exodus 12:2 the new moons are correct, as is the sun/the revolution of time/sha-neyh confirming Genesis 1:14 they divide the year for us months, days, and years.

Shalom
no the moon suggestion?????? So you are saying James Trimm accepting Enoch is silly and unfactual????

Shalom

J. Jury said:
It's opinion based on the fact that Scripture doesn't endorse the Enoch calendar. The Enoch calendar rejects lunar reckoning altogether, when Scripture blatantly teaches lunar reckoning.

Hence, it is opinion.

sevynn leverette said:
where does Scripture suugest this or is this opinion???????

Shalom

J. Jury said:
I would suggest that the moon- not the sun- divides the months. Otherwise, the moon seems to serve no real purpose, yet if used for lunar month cycles, then anyone can easily look out their window and see at what point one is during the month.

If the heavens are God's calendar, then (unlike the Enoch calendar), it was never really lost to the majority of the world. The moon has always been present.

sevynn leverette said:
YEWE is the Infinite Invisible Authority which has placed all things in order, the sun is the greater light the moon the lesser light, as YEWE is the greater light and the son the lesser, when the sun amd moon appear in the same thought passage the greater will always take its place in order of things as with Exodus 12:2 the new moons are correct, as is the sun/the revolution of time/sha-neyh confirming Genesis 1:14 they divide the year for us months, days, and years.

Shalom
I'm saying the moon is not a suggestion, but is, in fact, fact.

The "Book of Enoch" should really be called the 5 books of Enoch; plural. I honestly don't know where I stand regarding them at this point. Accept none of it? All of it? Certain books? I most certainly reject the calendar book.

sevynn leverette said:
no the moon suggestion?????? So you are saying James Trimm accepting Enoch is silly and unfactual????
Shalom
Genesis 1:14-16, "And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years: And let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth: and it was so. And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also."

God here has said that both the sun and the moon are to determine signs, seasons, days, years, etc. The moon is essential in the reckoning of time. The ancient Hebrews kept "new moon to new moon", yet the Enochian calendar rejects it altogether.

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