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Why we Should Fear the Muslim Brotherhood

http://www.americanthinker.com/2011/01/why_we_should_fear_the_mosle...

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oh dear God... the right wing republicans hear muslim and they start the doomscenario-propaganda machine... isn't this kind of stuff what caused millions of Jews to die ?

"isn't this kind of stuff what caused millions of Jews to die ?"

The Jews weren't Muslims and the National Socialists weren't Right-wing Republicans, so no.

Stereotyping Americans is much more subtle and prevalent than the stereotyping of most other groups, it's just that the political correctness engine of the liberal media doesn't care.
One out of a million might dare point out Hitler and the Palestinian Grand Mufti were allied (yes, that's right, anti-Jewish Nazis and anti-Jewish Muslims worked together, like they still do), and be branded a hatemonger and racist for it.
But if someone spews out the worst, most cliched, anti-Western, anti-Christian, anti-American rhetoric, they get a standing ovation. From Obama.

Now, I don't fear Islam, like I don't fear Atheism, Buddhism or Revolutionary Communism, as I know the Destroyer will soon wipe out all these false religions, leaving only his own worship and the religion of the 144,000.
However, until he comes to level the playing field, there will be an alliance between anti-Jewish, anti-Israel and anti-American forces, both Muslim and non-Muslim, as we have seen in the past and see in the present.
The same forces, lead by China and Russia, will take down the US (I'm expecting it this very year.)
When the State of Israel finally falls, it will be by the hand of the League of Arab Nations, and it will be because the US is unable to help.



I've excerpted a portion from the article, which you might want to re-read and verify for yourself, if it is true or not.

"As we follow the unfolding story in Egypt, we are torn between hope and fear -- hope that democracy will gain a toehold and fear that the fundamentalist Moslem Brothers could take control of Egypt.  Perhaps you have heard the Moslem Brothers are the oldest and largest radical Islamic group, the grandfather of Hezbollah, Hamas, and al-Qaeda.
What you haven't been told is this: the Moslem Brothers were a small, unpopular group of anti-modern fanatics unable to attract members, until they were adopted by Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich beginning in the 1930s.  Under the tutelage of the Third Reich, the Brothers started the modern jihadi movement, complete with a genocidal program against Jews.  In the words of Matthias Kuntzel, "[t]he significance of the Brotherhood to Islamism is comparable to that of the Bolshevik Party to communism: It was and remains to this day the ideological reference point and organizational core for all later Islamist groups, including al-Qaeda and Hamas."

What is equally ominous for Jews and Israel is that despite Mubarak's pragmatic coexistence with Israel for the last thirty years, every Egyptian leader from Nasser through Sadat to Mubarak has enshrined Nazi Jew-hatred in mainstream Egyptian culture out of both conviction and political calculation.  Nasser, trained by Nazis as a youth, spread the genocidal conspiracy theories of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, making it a bestseller throughout the Arab world.  On the Ramadan following 9/11, Mubarak presided over a thirty-week-long TV series dramatizing Elders and its genocidal message. "




Ishmael R. said:

oh dear God... the right wing republicans hear muslim and they start the doomscenario-propaganda machine... isn't this kind of stuff what caused millions of Jews to die ?

hmmm that's true.. most people don't know about tha nazi elements of most if not all islamic leaders

Christian said:
"isn't this kind of stuff what caused millions of Jews to die ?"

The Jews weren't Muslims and the National Socialists weren't Right-wing Republicans, so no.

Stereotyping Americans is much more subtle and prevalent than the stereotyping of most other groups, it's just that the political correctness engine of the liberal media doesn't care.
One out of a million might dare point out Hitler and the Palestinian Grand Mufti were allied (yes, that's right, anti-Jewish Nazis and anti-Jewish Muslims worked together, like they still do), and be branded a hatemonger and racist for it.


Ishmael R. said:

oh dear God... the right wing republicans hear muslim and they start the doomscenario-propaganda machine... isn't this kind of stuff what caused millions of Jews to die ?

well I know good muslims as well. Still Islam as well as Globalism (and others) are ideologies which twist the minds of people. I dont fear Islam neither, but as the above article states, there are strong anti-jewish and anti-christian (-nazarene) elements in islamic ideology. It is important to know this dark side, of course not in order to harm people, but to be able to see the fruit of it and take a position.  Antijudaism did not begin with Haj Amin Al Husseini, but was much earlier.

Recommended reading: Bat Ye´or, "The decline of eastern christianity under Islam": http://www.amazon.com/Decline-Eastern-Christianity-Under-Islam/dp/0...
Zadkiel said:

I fear Globalism more than Islam. I know many very good Muslims. I know of no Globalist I would trust.
Islam is a form of globalism and has been since its inception. 

DanHenrik said:

well I know good muslims as well. Still Islam as well as Globalism (and others) are ideologies which twist the minds of people. I dont fear Islam neither, but as the above article states, there are strong anti-jewish and anti-christian (-nazarene) elements in islamic ideology. It is important to know this dark side, of course not in order to harm people, but to be able to see the fruit of it and take a position.  Antijudaism did not begin with Haj Amin Al Husseini, but was much earlier.

Recommended reading: Bat Ye´or, "The decline of eastern christianity under Islam": http://www.amazon.com/Decline-Eastern-Christianity-Under-Islam/dp/0...
Zadkiel said:

I fear Globalism more than Islam. I know many very good Muslims. I know of no Globalist I would trust.

Islam is "Globalism" because from day one its mission has been world domination.

So George Soros has taken no position on a power shift in Egypt? 

 


Zadkiel said:

I disagree. Islam has certainly been virulently spread, but Globalist in the sense of a New World Order, operated by a Globalist cabal of big financiers with socialism as the vehicle of control-no. Islam doesn't meet the criteria. I dislike it when so-called conservatives blur the distinction between the two. True Globalists may use those forces for distablization, but have no love of Islam any more than they do for Judaism or Christianity, as they have made clear in various ways time and time again.

James Trimm said:
Islam is a form of globalism and has been since its inception. 

DanHenrik said:

well I know good muslims as well. Still Islam as well as Globalism (and others) are ideologies which twist the minds of people. I dont fear Islam neither, but as the above article states, there are strong anti-jewish and anti-christian (-nazarene) elements in islamic ideology. It is important to know this dark side, of course not in order to harm people, but to be able to see the fruit of it and take a position.  Antijudaism did not begin with Haj Amin Al Husseini, but was much earlier.

Recommended reading: Bat Ye´or, "The decline of eastern christianity under Islam": http://www.amazon.com/Decline-Eastern-Christianity-Under-Islam/dp/0...
Zadkiel said:

I fear Globalism more than Islam. I know many very good Muslims. I know of no Globalist I would trust.
Of course, that is human thinking. Everyone is better than the other. By the way, have you read the Quran?

Zadkiel said:
Lets be honest. There is a very strong strain of antagonism in Abrahamic religions across the board to other faiths. Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, etc. fare no better in the eyes of Christians than Christians do in the eyes of Islam.

DanHenrik said:

well I know good muslims as well. Still Islam as well as Globalism (and others) are ideologies which twist the minds of people. I dont fear Islam neither, but as the above article states, there are strong anti-jewish and anti-christian (-nazarene) elements in islamic ideology. It is important to know this dark side, of course not in order to harm people, but to be able to see the fruit of it and take a position.  Antijudaism did not begin with Haj Amin Al Husseini, but was much earlier.

Recommended reading: Bat Ye´or, "The decline of eastern christianity under Islam": http://www.amazon.com/Decline-Eastern-Christianity-Under-Islam/dp/0...
Zadkiel said:

I fear Globalism more than Islam. I know many very good Muslims. I know of no Globalist I would trust.
Then you will know the Suras proclaiming superiority over "other believers" as well as what to do with non-muslims ( i will perhaps not have to quote it here then)
Now the abrahamitic religion thing-whats the essence?? Avraham believed God and it was counted for him as righteousness--really a contrast to the concept of abrahamitic religion, depends on the single individuals relation to HaShem, his/her Emunah.
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Get Ready for the Muslim Brotherhood
By Ayaan Hirsi Ali  |  New York Times
Thursday, February 3, 2011
 
 
 
 
In 1985, as a teenager in Kenya, I was an adamant member of the Muslim Brotherhood. Seventeen years later, in 2002, I took part in a political campaign to win votes for the conservative party in the Netherlands.

Those two experiences gave me some insights that I think are relevant to the current crisis in Egypt. They lead me to believe it is highly likely but not inevitable that the Muslim Brotherhood will win the elections to be held in Egypt this coming September.

As a participant in an election campaign, I learned a few basic lessons:

The party must have a political program all members commit to with a vision of how to govern the country until the next election. Dissent within the party is a sure way of losing elections.
Candidates must articulate not only what they will do for the country but also why the other party's program will be catastrophic for the nation.
The party has to be embedded in as many communities as possible, regardless of social class, religion or even political views.
Candidates must constantly remind potential voters of their party's successes and the opponent's failures.
The secular democratic and human-rights groups in Egypt and in the rest of the Arab world show little sign of understanding these facts of political life. The Muslim Brotherhood, on the other hand, gets at least three out of four.

True, they have never been in office. But they have a political program and a vision not only until the next elections, but, in their view, until the Hereafter. And they are very good at reminding Egyptians of why the other party's policies will be ungodly and therefore catastrophic for Egypt. Above all, they have succeeded in embedding themselves in Egyptian society in ways that could prove crucial.

The Muslim Brotherhood will insist that a vote for them is a vote for Allah's law. But the positions of power in government will not be filled by God and his angels.
When I was 15 and considered myself a member of the Muslim Brotherhood movement, there were secular political groups in the diasporas of Pakistanis, Yemenis and Somalis, who lived in exile in Nairobi like my family. These loosely organized groups had vague plans for building their countries into peaceful, prosperous nations. These were dreams they never realized.

The Muslim Brotherhood did more than dream. With the help of money from Saudi Arabia and other oil-rich countries, they established cells in my school and functioning institutions in my neighborhood. There were extracurricular activities for all age groups. There were prayer and chant hours, as well as communal Koran readings. We were encouraged to become volunteers, to help the indigent, to spread Allah's message. They established charities to which we could tithe, which then provided health and educational centers.

The Brotherhood also provided the only functioning banking networks, based on trust. They rescued teenagers from lives of drug addiction and excited them about a purposeful future for justice. Each of us was expected to recruit more people. Most importantly, their message transcended ethnicity, social class and even educational levels.

It is true that the movement was violent, but we tend to underestimate in the West the Brotherhood's ability to adapt to reality and implement lessons learned. One such adaptation is the ongoing debate within the network on the use of violence. There are two schools of thought within the network, and both of them invoke the Prophet Mohammed.

Those who want instant jihad hark back to the time when the Prophet had small armies that defeated massive ones, as in the battles of Badr and Uhud. The nonviolent branch of the Brotherhood emphasizes the Prophet's perseverance and patience. They emphasize da'wa (persuasion through preaching and by example) and above all a gradual multi-generational process in coming to power and holding on to it. Above all, they argue for taqiyyah, a strategy to collaborate with your enemies until the time is ripe to defeat them or convert them to Islam.

Why are the secular democratic forces in Egypt so much weaker than the Muslim Brotherhood?

One reason is that they are an amalgam of very diverse elements: There are tribal leaders, free-market liberals, socialists, hard-core Marxists and human rights activists. In other words, they lack common ideological glue comparable to the one that the Brotherhood has. And there is a deep-seated fear that opposition to the Muslim Brotherhood, whose aim is to install Shariah once they come to power, will be seen by the masses as a rejection of Islam.

What the secular groups fail to do is to come up with a message of opposition that says "yes" to Islam, but "no" to Shariah--in other words, a campaign that emphasizes a separation of religion from politics. For Egypt and other Arab nations to escape the tragedy of either tyranny or Shariah, there has to be a third way that separates religion from politics while establishing a representative government, the rule of law, and conditions friendly to trade, investment and employment.

The bravery of the secular groups that have now unified behind Mohamed ElBaradei cannot be doubted. They have taken the world by surprise by mounting a successful protest against a tyrant.

The secular democrats' next challenge is the Brotherhood. They must waste no time in persuading the Egyptian electorate why a Shariah-based government would be bad for them. Unlike the Iranians in 1979, the Egyptians have before them the example of a people who opted for Shariah--the Iranians--and have lived to regret it.

The 2009 "green movement" in Iran was a not a "no" to a strongman, but a "no" to Shariah. ElBaradei and his supporters must make clear that a Shariah-based regime is repressive at home and aggressive abroad. Moreover, as the masses cry out against unemployment, rising food prices and corruption, Egypt's secular groups must show that a Shariah-based government would exacerbate these agonies.

The Muslim Brotherhood will insist that a vote for them is a vote for Allah's law. But the positions of power in government will not be filled by God and his angels. These positions will be filled by men so arrogant as to put themselves in the position of Allah. And as the Iranians of 2009 have learned to their cost, it is harder to vote such men out of office than to vote them in.

The Obama administration can help the secular groups with the resources and the skills necessary to organize, campaign and to establish competing economic and civil institutions so that they can defeat the Muslim Brotherhood at the ballot box.

As I have come to learn over the years, few things in democratic politics are inevitable. But without effective organization, the secular, democratic forces that have swept one tyranny aside could easily succumb to another.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali is a resident fellow at AEI.

Photo Credit: Flickr User Mahmoud Saber

yes of course it is an act of balance, but also to the other side. "anything" is very categorical, better to say nothing? Criticism cannot be avoided out of fear for fascism. I believe that not warning or being critical fosters more tension in society and perhaps violent reactions.
Please give me examples Zadkiel said:

Dan,

     An unbiased examination of all three Abrahamic religions demonstrates and inherent intolerance of other religions that often has led to violence and cleansing pogroms. Anything you say to the contrary is simply ignoring those facts and, in fact, ignoring your own Bible. Many examples can be provided.

To be fair, when was the last time you saw religious Christian terrorists or religious Jewish terrorists, blowing things up in the name of their religion ?
When I heard about the bombings in Moscow, I wasn't thinking "it must've been the Calvinists, back at it again !"

Here is a balanced record from "Open Doors" over recent pogroms and persecutions Do you notice a pattern?

 

ISLAMIC COUNTRIES DOMINATE OPEN DOORS 2011 WORLD WATCH LIST

2200 Christians are martyred on account of their faith

Although Communist North Korea tops Open Doors annual World Watch List (WWL) for the ninth consecutive year, the most dangerous places for Christians to live are overwhelmingly Muslim majority countries such as Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.

Eight of the top 10 countries on the 2011 WWL are Islamic majority countries. Persecution has increased in seven of them. They are Iran, which clamps down on a growing house church movement; Afghanistan, where the only way to practice Christianity is to worship in secret; and Saudi Arabia, which refuses to allow any Saudi person to convert to Christianity. Others are Somalia, which is ruled by terrorists and has a track record for killing Christians, the Maldives, where Christians are prevented from holding citizenship; Yemen and Iraq, where extremists massacred 58 Christians in Baghdad on 31 Oct. Of the top 30 countries, in only seven does the main threat of persecution stem from a source other than Islamic extremism.

The annual World Watch List is compiled by the research department of Open Doors. The List tracks the shifting conditions under which Christians live in societies around the world that are hostile to Christianity. It ranks the 50 places where it is hardest to practice the Christian faith and covers the period from 1 Nov. 2009, to 31 Oct. 2010.

The country where the deterioration of religious freedom for Christian was most severe, is Iraq, jumping from No. 17 to No. 8. The country has experienced an exodus of Christians in recent years, with less than 350,000 Christians remaining, only a third of the number of Christians living in the country at the start of the first Gulf War in 1991. Principally Christians are fleeing due to organized violence by an extremist militia, especially in the northern city of Mosul and in the capital Baghdad, an attempt by extremists to cleanse these regions of their Christian presence. At least 90 Christians were martyred last year in Iraq while hundreds more were injured in bomb and gun attacks.

in Nigeria, 2,000 Christians lost their lives in riots caused by Muslim extremists, primarily in Plateau State in the north of the country. However, elsewhere in the country Christians live in comparative freedom, able to worship and evangelise freely which accounts for Nigeria's seemingly low ranking of No. 23 on the new List. Tensions has been growing for more than a generation in northern Nigeria, and escalated after 1999 when 12 northern states adopted Sharia (strict Islamic law). In another fatal bomb attack on Christmas Eve, a Baptist pastor and five other Christians in northern Nigeria.

"Being a Muslim Background Believer or 'Secret Believer' in a Muslim-dominated country puts a bulls-eye on the backs of Christians," says Eddie Lyle, CEO of Open Doors UK and Ireland. "There is either no freedom to believe or little freedom of religion. And as the 2011 World Watch List reflects, the persecution of Christians in these Muslim countries continues to increase.

Although boasting a Christian community of more than 5 million, believers in Pakistan faced a perilous situation, which was reflected in its WWL ranking rising from No. 14 to No. 11. Twenty-nine Christians were martyred in the reporting period with at least one killing occurring every month. Four Christians were given long term jail sentences for blasphemy against Islam, at least 58 Christians were kidnapped, more than 100 Christians were assaulted and 14 churches and properties were damaged.

Other countries that rose markedly on the new WWL were Afghanistan, up from No. 6 to No. 3, especially in the wake of ugly demonstrations when footage of Muslims being baptized was shown on network television. Dozens of Christians from the tiny Afghan church have had to move due to subsequent death threats, and in August a 10-person medical aid team from a Christian organization was slaughtered.

While persecution continues to increase in Muslim-dominated countries, there is no question that North Korea deserves its No. 1 ranking. The state's attitude towards Christians is extremely hostile – they should not exist. There is no freedom to build churches or to worship in homes. Possession of Christian materials is punishable by death. In May 2010 a group of 23 Christians was discovered. The police found Bibles and other Christian literature. Three people were publicly executed, and the others disappeared within the infamous Yodok Prison camp. It is estimated that between 50,000 and 70,000 Christians suffer in prison camps. The number of Christian martyrs in North Korea is hard to discern because it is such a secretive society, but Open Doors reports that hundreds of believers have been arrested.

For more information, including a list of all 50 countries on the WWL, go to www.opendoorsuk.org/worldwatch

 

Is this pure coincidence ????

 

 


Christian said:

To be fair, when was the last time you saw religious Christian terrorists or religious Jewish terrorists, blowing things up in the name of their religion ?
When I heard about the bombings in Moscow, I wasn't thinking "it must've been the Calvinists, back at it again !"

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