Nazarene Space

Halacha on Hunted Meat

Passed on 2/5/99

Lev. 17:13:
And whatever man... hunts and catches any beast or fowl that may be eaten; he shall even pour out the blood thereof, and cover it with dust...

I. Meat obtained by hunting may be eaten (Lev. 17:13) provided the following conditions are met:

* The animal is a clean animal (Lev. 11)
# The animals blood is poured out (Lev. 17:13)
# The blood is covered with dust (Lev. 17:13)
# The animal is examined to determine if it is TEREFAH (torn)
(Ex 22, Lev 7:24, 17:15 and 22:8)
(the wound inflicted in the hunt is not counted in this examination).
# The internal organs and fat are removed.

Views: 139

Replies to This Discussion

Must it be literally covered with actual dust from the ground ?
My family owns forest where moose is hunted.
How do you suggest the meat be prepared and the animal treated?
Hunting - Jewish Encyclopedia
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=971&letter=H&a...

My research on hunting indicated that the animal after it is killed, having the heart stop before it was drained of blood, that the animal could not be properly koshered.

Part of the kosher slaughter process humanely slitting the neck of an animal whose heart is still beating enables the heart to evacuate blood from the tissues. Attempting to adequately bleed a dead animal will not render the same results.
See Lev. 17:13

Ann Wilson said:
Hunting - Jewish Encyclopedia
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=971&letter=H&a...

My research on hunting indicated that the animal after it is killed, having the heart stop before it was drained of blood, that the animal could not be properly koshered.

Part of the kosher slaughter process humanely slitting the neck of an animal whose heart is still beating enables the heart to evacuate blood from the tissues. Attempting to adequately bleed a dead animal will not render the same results.
So how should one treat moose?

Assume it is shot and killed - then what? Can it not be eaten? How else is one going to kill a moose?

Do you suggest I stealthily sneak up on it like a ninja sicarii, and slit his throat?

Look, I really want to know. So far, nobody has given a clear detailed answer. It's time for someone to act the Rabbi, and give a detailed answer on how to put the Scriptures into practice on this issue - moose hunting, and by extension all hunting of deer, elk, etc

f.ex:

STEP 1 - you see the moose
STEP 2 - ???

James Trimm said:
See Lev. 17:13
Ann Wilson said:
Hunting - Jewish Encyclopedia
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=971&letter=H&a...
My research on hunting indicated that the animal after it is killed, having the heart stop before it was drained of blood, that the animal could not be properly koshered. Part of the kosher slaughter process humanely slitting the neck of an animal whose heart is still beating enables the heart to evacuate blood from the tissues. Attempting to adequately bleed a dead animal will not render the same results.
I suggest a bullet or a bow and arrow.
Ha-ha.
Does this not kill the animal without draining the blood? I was of the understanding you condemned this.

James Trimm said:
I suggest a bullet or a bow and arrow.
thank you, much more helpful, Rebbe Anaiah.
However, I guess one has to be familiar with the logistics of hunting to answer this.
I wish there were multiple rabbis here - is there any chance of recruiting more people to answer shilahs and questions?

Anaiah Priel (Andrew P) Carlson said:
I am not sure what James Trimm believes, but remember, we are not Rabbinics (at least some of us are not). So, some of us differ and aren't as extreme.
Does Scripture anywhere say you are to kill the animal by slitting its throat? No. However, it does say to drain the blood. So, AFTER it dies, you are to IMMEDIATELY start draining the blood out of the animal, by perhaps slitting the throat after it has died.
YHWH says that normally domesticated meat is to be slaughtered "as I have commanded you" (Deut. 12:21). Tis command from YHWH as to just how to slaughter an animal is not found in the written Torah, it was part of the Oral Torah and was recorded in the Mishna (tractate Hullin) it involves slitting the jugular with a very sharp knife.

The Beit Din ruling makes an obvious exception for hunted meat, so long as the conditions mentioned the halacha are met.

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